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Thread: General Wolves News

  1. #15211
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    Giles unused on the bench again tonight. Seems weird he didn't go back to Salop.

  2. #15212
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    Quote Originally Posted by GLASGOWOLF View Post
    Loved that article.
    2 players currently at the club have fucking awful attitudes, they will never play for Nuno, which fits in with what she said.
    Who are you thinking of? Mystery Phil and Bright?

  3. #15213
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    Jordan Graham.
    Oh my god! Whitney's dead? How's Michael Jackson taking it?

  4. #15214
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lincs_Wolf View Post
    Giles unused on the bench again tonight. Seems weird he didn't go back to Salop.
    Not fit enough according to Robins as in conditioning

  5. #15215
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    He's not going to play for Coventry in his correct position. Weird move.

  6. #15216
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    Quote Originally Posted by machin05 View Post
    Paging LemonJelly - Michael Kightly on the next episode of Old Gold Club!

    https://twitter.com/Wolves/status/1225053964804055042
    I listened to that over the weekend and it kind of brought back all my old Kightly love.

    I adored him when he played for us and was pretty pissed off with the way he left. Listening to the podcast though you can tell how much he loves the club and the fans and, after all the injuries, I can sort of sympathise with him wanting to take that chance to stay in the Premier League. I still think he should have stayed (and you can tell he wishes he hadn't left) but I don't have any animosity towards him anymore.

    I followed it up by listening to the Roger Johnson one. It is a pretty honest interview and fair play to him for doing it. I actually ended up feeling sorry for him a bit. He admits he made mistakes and it's not like he deliberately went out to play badly or anything. Plus, he never asked to leave or refused to play (unlike others who have played for us) no matter how badly it was going for him. He still speaks highly of the club and the fans too.

    Maybe I should listen to the Karl Henry one next to see if I can get past him being a Brexit loving Tory prick!
    I pledge my grievance to the flag

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  7. #15217
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    Some lunchtime reading for me as it is a long article on Traore.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/51459137

  8. #15218
    GLASGOWOLF is offline Not English you say? Got my eyes on you then
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoodleWolf View Post
    Who are you thinking of? Mystery Phil and Bright?
    Bright, and Jordan Graham.

    Brights always on the piss
    Jordan has a stinking attitude

  9. #15219
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    Quote Originally Posted by GLASGOWOLF View Post
    Bright, and Jordan Graham.

    Brights always on the piss
    Jordan has a stinking attitude
    I think Graham is one of those, if he is happy he is fine but not going his way a bit of a stroppy twat. Clearly not going to be happy at Wolves as he had zero chance of playing (although why we took up the extra year I don't know) and he had a move to Bulgaria break down because of a dodgy fax machine. So I get why his attitude won't be the best.

    On Bright - My new neighbour talked about him when he knew I was a wolves fan last summer. Mr Neighbour used to run a Nighclub in Brum and Bright was always in there, espeically before a match day and wouldn't leavve until around 2am. So again, no shocks.

  10. #15220
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sniffer Grouse View Post
    Some lunchtime reading for me as it is a long article on Traore.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/51459137
    Really enjoyed that, cheers.

  11. #15221
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    Man City banned from the Champs League for 2 years...as it stands 5th might get CL next year...

  12. #15222
    YoungWolf is online now World Cup 2014 PTG Champion - Not actually that Young, don't be confused by the pre-teen posting style.
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    Jose can’t believe his luck right now.

    We are absolutely in the race for it now though. A win tonight would be fantastic

  13. #15223
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    Well, I've just had a chat with Raul and his missus in Pets At Home, Wolves. Whilst Raul was polite in a "don't upset the big, bald fucker" kind of way, his missus was an absolute delight, and was quite animated in her thoughts about the match last night.

  14. #15224
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    Thought this article from the Athletic was worth a share

    An arrested flare-thrower, Leicester fans squabbling with Leicester fans, and an act of furious anti-VAR vandalism – Welcome to Molineux’s epicentre


    It’s 9.54 on Friday evening and Molineux is rapidly emptying. Wolves have just drawn 0-0 with Leicester City and the majority of the 30,000 fans dispersing onto the streets of Wolverhampton are grumbling about VAR.

    The players have headed down the tunnel and, after a frustrating evening for the home team, calm is being restored. Except, that is, in one small room tucked away at the back of the South Bank.

    From this bunker, Molineux, probably unbeknown to the thousands who have turned up just to watch a game of football, has been monitored, organised and kept safe via the help of dozens of CCTV cameras and a safety officer who, working alongside the emergency services, has taken charge of more than 400 stewards and staff in an intricate, detailed and professional operation.

    And while the game may have finished, the night’s drama isn’t over. Just a few minutes earlier, a blue flare was dangerously lobbed from the away section straight into the South Bank in the direction of Wolves supporters. The culprit quickly made his way out of the ground before he could be identified and stopped — but the man and the group of people he’s with have been halted by a police officer on an unrelated matter after a few post-match verbals were being thrown around.

    The police officer’s conversation with the group, it just so happens, is being captured on live CCTV.

    Someone monitoring the cameras has, incredibly, among images that are showing thousands of people leaving Molineux, spotted the flare-thrower. “That’s him… that’s the guy who threw the pyro,” he says decisively.

    After the image of the flare being thrown is slotted alongside the live recording of his chat with the officer outside, the match is confirmed.

    Immediately a message is relayed to the officer at the scene…he escorts the suspect to one side. His raised right hand is mysteriously pigmented. Yes, he’s been caught very blue-handed. Arrest made and, via the eagle eye in the stadium control room, job done.

    Welcome to Molineux’s epicentre.

    After 16 years as the club’s head of operations, this is the domain of Steve Sutton, the man with the sharp eye.

    In front of him is a wall of 24 screens, on which images from 180 cameras positioned in and around Molineux are shown. If this is The Truman Show, Sutton is its Ed Harris, the all-seeing eye.

    From the control room, which has a glorious view of the inside of Molineux (behind dark-tinted, double-glazed glass which almost completely muffles noise from the stadium) Sutton and his well-drilled team will keep an eye out for — and react to — crowd disorder, racism, violence, medical emergencies, flare-throwing and excessive beer drinking, among dozens of other things; as The Athletic finds out after being granted exclusive behind-the-scenes access.

    It’s a slick operation — and one which starts several hours before kick-off.

    “Ultimately we’re here for peoples’ safety,” Sutton tells his senior stewards in a pre-match briefing.

    He’s recounting the details of an incident which took place during Wolves’ last home match, against Liverpool, when a supporter suffered a cardiac arrest. A steward performed CPR as he waited for paramedics to arrive. The man survived and is now recovering. It was one of just six heart attacks suffered during Molineux matches in the past nine years. Only three of those six survived — and one steward, who works in the South Bank, helped on two occasions.

    “Kevin Moss made a real difference,” Sutton proudly says. “He put his training into action and everyone played a part in helping this man. It’s worth sharing that with your staff tonight.”

    It’s Valentine’s Day but a box of chocolates being shared among the senior staff is as romantic as it will get for Sutton and his team. They’ve got a job to do — Leicester are in town, it’s a high-profile Friday night match and the potential for problems occurring is never far away.

    Leicester are flying in the league and it’s a derby of sorts, albeit a tenuous one. Sutton tells his staff to be aware of the potential risks posed to and from both sets of fans.

    Flares have been used at five of Leicester’s away matches this season, amid a variety of other incidents. Wolves fans can be far from angels too — as everyone is well aware — so every angle must be covered.

    The stewards are all given briefing sheets, detailing their usual roles and responsibilities but also specific information relating to tonight’s visitors. There are 15 away coaches on the way. The potential for organised disorder is classed as ‘low’, while spontaneous disorder is considered a ‘medium’ risk.

    Stewards are reminded to conduct thorough searches (of anyone aged over 14) and remove bottle-tops, while those working in the South Bank (Molineux’s self-proclaimed rowdy stand) are reminded to keep an eye out for people standing on their seats.

    “Watch those front rows for any issues with throwing, spitting, abuse,” Sutton adds. “Get your stewards proactively working those areas and challenging unacceptable behaviour. If you need support, let us know.

    “When there are controversial incidents on the pitch, get them up off their seats and monitoring the crowd.”

    These senior stewards will now go and brief their sub-teams of a couple of dozen stewards in sections around Molineux’s four stands, before a last-minute search is conducted, combing each row of seats. There will be one steward for every 250 supporters in the stadium, which also has 20 first-aiders and three paramedic crews on duty.

    In the control room — the hub where every decision relating to support safety or crowd disorder is made — things are starting to get busy. Soon the room will be packed with two CCTV monitoring specialists, a manager for each stand, representatives from West Midlands Police and ambulance services and operatives for the phone and communication lines, who will play a crucial role in the evening’s events, siphoning calls and relating information to Sutton and others.

    The match has been categorised as ‘B’, with A being the lowest risk of trouble and C the highest.

    Dozens of factors have gone into making that assessment such as; kick-off-time, whether the fixture is high profile or a local derby, whether there is any animosity between the teams (or any figure who may rile the home supporters, such as an ex-player or manager, either of Wolves or even main rivals West Bromwich Albion), if the game is all-ticket, or if the away club have only brought season-ticket holders (if it went to general sale, there could be more problematic fans with tickets.)

    Sutton has a huge database at his disposal that lists the fixtures between Wolves and Leicester since 2003 and states absolutely anything of note that happened in or around the stadium.

    For instance, at the last Molineux encounter between the teams (a 4-3 win for Wolves on a Saturday lunchtime in January last year), a group of Leicester supporters were found in Wolverhampton city centre without tickets — and sent back to Leicester by police.

    During the game, one fan was refused entry for being drunk, two were ejected for foul and abusive language and another for throwing a bottle, while there was one arrest for breach of the peace.

    Molineux’s gates open at 6.30pm and the next hour and a half will focus on getting over 30,000 people swiftly and safely inside the stadium. A CCTV sweep is performed to check there is nothing awry and staff will keep an eye out for ticket touts as well as beggars.

    The state-of-the-art, high-resolution cameras cover the seats, concourses, car parks, surrounding streets and even the corridor leading to the dressing rooms. The system at Wolves’ disposal has improved immeasurably (they couldn’t pause or rewind footage two years ago), enabling them to identify trouble-makers far easier than before. Every seat in the ground is covered.

    The only problem they have at the moment is a stray car in the Steve Bull Stand’s car park, which is shared with the University of Wolverhampton during the week (staff are asked to clear the cars by 5pm for a midweek match). After a couple of attempts to contact the owner via the university, a tow truck is called.

    The Wolves players have just arrived on their team coach — 100 metres down Waterloo Road, Leicester’s bus is being held back. The away team must always arrive after Wolves as their bus remains parked by the same entrance for the rest of the night. After Leicester pull in, the signal is made to fully close off Waterloo Road to traffic (a rule that was brought in a couple of years ago for match days).

    Fans start heading inside in dribs and drabs, while in the control room there are a few relatively minor incidents to deal with — an ambulance has been badly parked and is blocking a walkway, while in the stadium’s Fan Zone a steward has fallen over. Bonita, who staffs the phones and radio, is asking for a wheelchair to be dispatched.

    At 7.05pm, it isn’t looking good for the university car. The recovery truck of doom has arrived and begins dragging the car up its ramp. But wait! In a development as dramatic as almost anything that will be seen on the pitch tonight, its owner has showed up in the nick of time. After some gentle pleading, she is allowed to drive her car home. Panic over, s