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Thread: A jolly good read?

  1. #1
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    A jolly good read?

    As we seem to have lost the book thread in the great crash of 2010, i thought it might be an idea to kick it off again.

    i've been down with flu (not a little sister) and started getting into my winter book stock.

    Firstly, mega thanks to paddy and the brilliant squeeze. I read the Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini a couple of days ago, excellent book, a very good read and a great insight into the troubled life of Afghans in the current long running saga.

    many thanks chaps a warm welcome awaits you in the summer, or sooner.

    Yesterday I started "I am Ozzy" by the great man himself, and i couldn't put it down.

    it gave me any number of fits of coffee spitting hysterics, and caused a few unwanted breathless coughing fits too.

    I know the guy and a few of the characters in his life story, as well as Aston and many of the venues he mentions, but he comes out with so many hillarious phrases, and episodes in his life, that he had me literally in tears.

    How he is still alive has always been a bit of a mystery, but having read this, if i hadn't seen him on the telly, i wouldn't believe it.

    Even if you don't like the guy, read the book , i haven't laughed so much in years.
    "Never enter into a battle of wits, with an unarmed man"

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    I've just finished Alone in Berlin by Hans Fallada, a quality read. Also enjoyed Tom Rob Smith's first two novels Child 44 and The Secret Speech.

  3. #3
    I am a victim. I used to read every single day, without fail. Now I never have the time, and if I have the time I don't have the inclination - variations of the same excuse. I was thinking the same about music, I spend so much time listening to all the music I used to listen to that I don't spare the energy on what is new now. I am a victim of multi-channel TV, the internet, a career, a family, a victim.

    I think the last book I read was on the history of the organisation of workplaces for my degree. There was no plot and the sex scenes were bland.

    I must go down to Waterstones before they go bust.
    No.

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    I haven't bought a CD since about 2004. I've never downloaded anything.

    I've made it a mission (as part of my recovery) to get into *someone* new this year. Even if it is all derivative shite.
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  5. #5
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    I have just started reading some Alastair Reynolds sci-fi. Really interesting and good stuff. Trouble is, I am struggling to get time for novels lately as I am deeply immersed in the new Pathfinder roleplaying game and seem to spend most waking hours reading that or on here
    I'm looking California

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    The Stand by Stephen King, epic, also Jean Auels Clan of the Cave Bear

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    Just finished " This Book will save your life" by A M Homes. Not bad, started slowly but got better
    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post

    I honestly didn't think people were that stupid...

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    Started Nelson Mandela - Long Walk to Freedom before Christmas, need to get back to it.
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    The long walk by Richard Bachman...feckin great

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    animal farm by george Orwell

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    Best book I've read recently- 'Think of a Number' by John Verdon.

    Best book I've ever read- 'The Book Thief' by Markus Zusak. Absolutely essential reading IMO. If you don't weep with both sadness and joy then you have a heart made of stone. It will, in time, deservedly be seen as a classic along with such books as 'Of Mice and Men', '1984', 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest', 'Catch 22' etc etc...
    Last edited by Toon Wolf; 31st January 2011 at 09:11 PM.
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  12. #12
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    Could I have a brief synopsis please? I am always interested in finding new authors and you are selling it rather well.
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    The best series I've ever read is Ian Rankin's Rebus. Unbelievably good.
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    with you on that - excellent stuff. the one based around the london bombs and G7 summit is a great book.
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    I do enjoy the Creasy series by A J Quinnell. Which includes Man On Fire.
    "The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it's difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine" - Abraham Lincoln

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paddingtonwolf View Post
    Could I have a brief synopsis please? I am always interested in finding new authors and you are selling it rather well.
    Okay:

    The Book Thief is about a young girl who is orphaned when her parents are taken to a concentration camp. She is taken to Munich where she is fostered by a family and the father teaches her to read. Through reading she finds redemption and the story centres around her relationship with the father, a Jewish man they hide from the Nazis and a young boy who wants to be Jesse Owens. Oh, and most of the story is narrated by Death, as in The Grim Reaper. It is about both the futility and the wonder of human nature and I've never laughed nor cried so much whilst reading a book ...I don't know anyone to whom I have recommended this book who hasn't loved it. It has been adapted to be a book for 'young adults', but truthfully, anyone should read it.
    Write down everything you know about football on the back of a postage stamp. In the space you have left over you can draw a picture...

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    Sounds very interesting. I might look that up actually.
    "The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it's difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine" - Abraham Lincoln

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    blimey. that sounds really intriguing. I shall pick it up off amazon and give it a go. thanks.
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    "They called it Passchendaele" by Lyn MacDonald, - A harrowing account of the blood bath that was the third battle of Ypres in 1917.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deutsch Wolf View Post
    The best series I've ever read is Ian Rankin's Rebus. Unbelievably good.

    ive read a few rubus books , very good books , i need to get a few more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paddingtonwolf View Post
    I have just started reading some Alastair Reynolds sci-fi. Really interesting and good stuff. Trouble is, I am struggling to get time for novels lately as I am deeply immersed in the new Pathfinder roleplaying game and seem to spend most waking hours reading that or on here
    I've read all his stuff apart from the latest. Revelation space and Redemption ark are epic. jealous of you. have you read A fire upon the deep by Vernor Vinge?

    I read Stephen King's The Stand years ago when everyone raved about it. I thought it was too long and overrated - it just petered out.

    Last book I read was gateway by fred pohl and currently started reading the latest iain banks and the orange eats creeps by grace krilanovich - the blurb says this book "will mess you up" so I hope I'm not disappointed.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by nimrod View Post
    I've read all his stuff apart from the latest. Revelation space and Redemption ark are epic. jealous of you. have you read A fire upon the deep by Vernor Vinge?

    I read Stephen King's The Stand years ago when everyone raved about it. I thought it was too long and overrated - it just petered out.

    Last book I read was gateway by fred pohl and currently started reading the latest iain banks and the orange eats creeps by grace krilanovich - the blurb says this book "will mess you up" so I hope I'm not disappointed.
    Interesting point Nimrod. I am a Stephen King fan, and "The Stand" was superb in my opinion. Yes it was long, but King has always been one for detail. I did not think it petered out, but I respect your views.

  23. #23
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    I've got 3 main authors I just get as soon as one of theirs is released , it's mine.

    Lee Childs
    Nelson De Mille
    James Lee Burke

    Lee Childs has a guy called Reacher, ex army, tough, big, wandering around America (But has been to France & Germany), gets involved in stuff always wins. Great story telling, virtually no romance, very sparse writing action packed and just terriffic reading.

    Nelson De Mille, has two characters one is an American cop the other is a solicitor, complex plots, well written, lots of action, dry sense of humour but deeply affecting, highly convincing action, rivetting plots.

    James Lee Burke has two characters too, one based in Missoula in Montana, a kind of lawman, a bit self righteous, but the writing is terrific, extremely descriptive, and the other is a detective based in New Iberia, Louisiana, and has a rough private detective. Great reads the lot of them.

    I have every book those three have written and apart from JP Donleavy, Len Deighton and John Le Carrie are the only authors I've ever read twice.
    Check 'em out on Amazon.
    Everything is a choice. Bad choices make good stories. Design your own disaster. Create your life.

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    Sorry to lower the high-browness of it all, but im a big fan of anything written by Roger Kettle and Andrew Christine (Beau Peep, Man Called Horace) , or Goscinny and Uderzo ( Asterix).

    The Tintin books by Herge were good too
    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post

    I honestly didn't think people were that stupid...

  25. #25
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    I used to read at least a book a week, but just don't have the bloody time anymore, or inclination. Some books I'd highly recommend if you get chance.

    The old man and the sea - hemmingway (although I'd read at least one of his other books first)

    A good collection of short stories by Jack London, to include 'to build a fire' and 'a piece of steak' I would also recommend his semi-autobiography 'jack barleycorn' a very interesting account of his alcoholism.

    Arthur keostler - darkness at noon. A brilliant novel exploring where the Russian revolution failed in it's objectives.

    Milan Kundra - the unbelievable weightness of being. There's a number of his novels I could pick out but I guess this is his most polished.

    Leo Tolstoy - Anna karenina, a great Russian novel, the quality of the Russian authors is amazing, this is a fine example.

    George Orwel - one of my favourites and a great effort should be made to read his short stories along with his big novels.

    Bret Easton Ellis - a writer who shocks with his views of the morally devoid youth of upper middle class America, American psycho being his most famous. A truly shocking book.

    I don't read much these days, shocking really, I'd recommend some more bur I'm late for work already
    Last edited by Newbridge Wolf; 1st February 2011 at 07:56 AM.

  26. #26
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    Currently reading The road to Wigan Pier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ROVERT47 View Post
    Currently reading The road to Wigan Pier.
    If you like that, try Jack Londons 'People of the Abyss' He was sent to London to interview someone when it fell through, so he spent a period of time with the down and outs and destitute and wrote up his experiences. At the time (1900) England was the most powerful, and richest nation on the planet, yet the experiences of what a large number of our population lived through were truly shocking.

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    Nothing wrong with Asterix or Tintin. Nice books although I tend to prefer my graphic novels to be a little grittier - Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Dark Knight, that sort of thing.

    Other sci-fi: Peter F Hamilton is quality, if a bit verbose at times.

    As an aside, I liked the Stand and bought the special edition with the extra hundred or so pages. It is a great story. IT* was a bit overlong though.

    *IT as in the one in Derry with the clown, not relating back to the Stand
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newbridge Wolf View Post
    If you like that, try Jack Londons 'People of the Abyss' He was sent to London to interview someone when it fell through, so he spent a period of time with the down and outs and destitute and wrote up his experiences. At the time (1900) England was the most powerful, and richest nation on the planet, yet the experiences of what a large number of our population lived through were truly shocking.
    Thanks,will do,i've spent most of my life not being much of reader to be honest,i blame the original 'bog standard' Comprehensives,so i decided last year that i wanted to read all the classics,my eldest bought me The road to wigan pier and 1984 for Christmas,i think he thought i wanted cheering up a bit.I read To kill a mocking bird while on holiday in Australia at the end of last year,any other recommendations would be appreciated.

  30. #30
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    War and Peace by Tolstoy. Block out a year in your diary for that one.
    The Count of Monte Cristo by Dumas is fantastic
    Bleak House by Dickens - almost ruined by my studying it for A level, but reading it now without all the analysis that English scholars chuck at it is rather refreshing.
    I'm looking California

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