Page 2 of 42 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 1250

Thread: A jolly good read?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Guildford
    Posts
    5,281
    Currently reading The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet by David Mitchell. Absolutely brilliant, as is everything he writes - Cloud Atlas, Ghostwritten, No.9 Dream, Black Swan green - all great.

    Another recent fave was Stasiland by Anna Funder. It's several people's personal experiences of life in East Germany under communism and after the fall of the Wall. She speaks to people who tried to escape, people whose lives were destroyed by the Stasi, informers and Stasi opeatives themselves. It reads like fiction and is by turns sad, funny and terrifying.

    Also anything by James Ellroy generally hits the spot.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Leicestershire countryside
    Posts
    2,630
    the green man by Kingsley Amis...excellent

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,746
    Quote Originally Posted by ROVERT47 View Post
    Thanks,will do,i've spent most of my life not being much of reader to be honest,i blame the original 'bog standard' Comprehensives,so i decided last year that i wanted to read all the classics,my eldest bought me The road to wigan pier and 1984 for Christmas,i think he thought i wanted cheering up a bit.I read To kill a mocking bird while on holiday in Australia at the end of last year,any other recommendations would be appreciated.

    Ahh the joys of a painful English lesson/Teacher, it was the best part of two decades before I realised that Dickens is a good read.

    Steinbeck novels are always very powerful, and an enjoyable read, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men.

    Hemmingway has some very good, nice reads, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and the one where he's based in Italy in WW1, the name escapes me at the moment.

    Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge and Jude the Obscure. All good enjoyable reads.

    A good collection of Jack Londonís short stories, and Henry Williamsonís classics (Tarka the Otter, etc) for a nature lover as myself are good/interesting reads

    To be honest you can't go too wrong with the classics, although some can seem quite stuffy compared with modern writings.

    I'd stay well clear of War and Peace, I've read a third, but rather than a year I'd recommend you dedicate a month to it and do nothing else - it is very intense and it is easy to loose track of the characters, Russian names and all that aren't the easiest, and if you've not picked it up for a week it is murder to try and get back into it.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Leicestershire countryside
    Posts
    2,630
    You cant go far wrong with any of the Bronte novels.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pendeford
    Posts
    63,734
    There are two fabulous books novelising the life of Henri IV of France by Heinrich Mann - excellent reads both of them.
    I'm looking California

    I'm feeling Minnesota

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    spiderland
    Posts
    4,013
    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMunro-371 View Post
    Interesting point Nimrod. I am a Stephen King fan, and "The Stand" was superb in my opinion. Yes it was long, but King has always been one for detail. I did not think it petered out, but I respect your views.
    no problem. it is my opinion and I know a lot of people like it. I think it's a Stephen King thing. cop out ending I thought as well

    I have a similar view on "american psycho." I have no idea how people can even call it a book. It's like a cross between two magazines, one for how to murder and dismember a body for sexual gartification written as graphically as possible, and the other on high fashion that everyone was wearing during the eighties, with both parts written as tediously as possible. The book does have a shock factor and I appreciate there's meant to be some irony in there but my conclusion was it's both pointless and shit. Didn't Ellis actually write it as a joke to show that anything can get published, or is that an urban myth? I felt the joke was on me for both buying it and reading it anyway.

    Some other good stuff:
    wind up bird chronicle - murakami
    ghostwritten - david mitchell (similar style to murakami) [just seen So Long Architect's post - good man]
    something wicked this way comes - ray bradbury (great horror book)
    Pretty much anything by Graham Greene

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Leicestershire countryside
    Posts
    2,630
    trashcan man was great in the stand, a great character, superbly put over by King. I think Kings attention to detail, and the characters he has is what makes his books. Like Pennywise the clown in "IT"

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pendeford
    Posts
    63,734
    If you like horror books and classics you can do a lot worse than getting a compilation of Lovecraft or Poe.
    I'm looking California

    I'm feeling Minnesota

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,746
    I disagree on Ellis, it was a reflection on the vacuous upper middle classes that he has written so many books concerning - devoid of all moral compasses he illustrates how an apparently normal person could operate a double life as a psychotic killer in the society they exist within - well that was my view on it, it could well be a joke, but having read all of his work, it fits in with his style and underlying philosophy.

  10. #40
    The Long Emergency by James Howard Kunstler, written in 2005 it predicts bird/swine flu and the banking collapse amongst other things. If you want to understand the latest Suez canal crisis or why everyone wants to fight over Afganistan then give this a read. Heavy going at times, but it will open your eyes in a rather sobering way.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    vasilika, evia, greece
    Posts
    10,006
    The Long Emergency by James Howard Kunstler, written in 2005 it predicts bird/swine flu and the banking collapse amongst other things. If you want to understand the latest Suez canal crisis or why everyone wants to fight over Afganistan then give this a read. Heavy going at times, but it will open your eyes in a rather sobering way.

    I read a book many many years ago in this vein called "The Third World War" written by a retired NATO general who's name escapes me at the moment.
    He predicted the third world war would be fought over Water.
    His predictions of millions trying to leave the African continent, due to drought and crop failiure, by way of boats and in the back of lorries, and heading for europe is now fact. A very good, if not a touch disturbing read.
    "Never enter into a battle of wits, with an unarmed man"

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    3,438
    the dune trilogy, hard work at times but good

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    16,247
    Interesting the amount of fiction in this thread.

    I tend to read a lot of factual stuff. I'm big on reading almost anything related to Jack the Ripper I can lay my hands on.

    Just finished a super book called Newton & the Counterfeiter by Thomas Levenson. I never knew Newton was warden of the Mint!

    Stephen Kings On Writing was the first book of his I read for many years (I kinda felt he got a bit boring/repetitve with insomnia & so on). On Writing is a remarkable book. Loved it. It has made me want to read the dark half and the dead zone, which I own, but never got around to.

    I am currently reading The Crimes, Detection & Death of Jack the Ripper by Martin Fido.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pendeford
    Posts
    63,734
    I will often sit with my head in a historical text. Got a heavy duty tome on the reformation on the go, that is brilliant, but not exactly a page-turner.
    I'm looking California

    I'm feeling Minnesota

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    5,619
    I'd second the recommendation of The Book Thief. A wonderful read and Toon is right that you *will* cry.

    Going back to my Hans Fallada recommendation, I'd say it has parallels with The Book Thief, albeit written sixty years earlier.

    I also quite like(d) Richard Montanari but his last effort was absolutely dire - characters you couldn't identify with (except the villain) and all the hallmarks of a writer who got bored with the book from the halfway point. It's a shame because his previous efforts with the Byrne and Balzano characters were, IMO, rather good.

  16. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Leicestershire countryside
    Posts
    2,630
    Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake... Nearly gave up, but thankfully didnt, a great trilogy, possibly stretched out a bit, but good

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Darkest Lincolnshire.
    Posts
    36,785
    Quote Originally Posted by lemonjelly View Post
    Interesting the amount of fiction in this thread.

    I tend to read a lot of factual stuff. I'm big on reading almost anything related to Jack the Ripper I can lay my hands on.

    Just finished a super book called Newton & the Counterfeiter by Thomas Levenson. I never knew Newton was warden of the Mint!

    Stephen Kings On Writing was the first book of his I read for many years (I kinda felt he got a bit boring/repetitve with insomnia & so on). On Writing is a remarkable book. Loved it. It has made me want to read the dark half and the dead zone, which I own, but never got around to.

    I am currently reading The Crimes, Detection & Death of Jack the Ripper by Martin Fido.
    I know we have discussed this intriguing subject before, but after everything I have read, I really still think Dr Tumblety was the ripper. Nothing concrete, but he just ticks so many of the boxes.

  18. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cannock
    Posts
    6,459
    Quote Originally Posted by pavlosmacwolf View Post
    I read a book many many years ago in this vein called "The Third World War" written by a retired NATO general who's name escapes me at the moment.
    He predicted the third world war would be fought over Water.
    His predictions of millions trying to leave the African continent, due to drought and crop failiure, by way of boats and in the back of lorries, and heading for europe is now fact. A very good, if not a touch disturbing read.
    General John Hackett ?

  19. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NW Leicestershire
    Posts
    13,078
    I prefer sporting biographies to fiction.

    Prior to the Ashes starting I read Duncan Hamilton's book on Harold Larwood and would certainly recommend it. The way he was treated after the bodyline series was a national disgrace which was only partly rectified many decades later when John Major awarded him an MBE in 1993.

  20. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    15,369
    Does anyone use an e-book reader? Such as the Amazon Kindle?

    I have recently switched to using the Kindle app on my iPad and I am thoroughly enjoying the experience. Not everyone's favourite way to read buy I love having everything in one place (books, newspaper, gaming, internet etc)
    Last edited by Stan Hullis; 2nd February 2011 at 02:12 PM.

  21. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Darkest Lincolnshire.
    Posts
    36,785
    The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen Donaldson. Superb, some say the idea was taken from The Lord of the Rings, but Donaldson proves himself to be a master of the fantasy novel.

  22. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    16,247
    Quote Originally Posted by Paddingtonwolf View Post
    I will often sit with my head in a historical text. Got a heavy duty tome on the reformation on the go, that is brilliant, but not exactly a page-turner.
    Citizens, By Simon Schama was like that for me. A good read, but 950 pages. Took an eternity to get through!

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMunro-371 View Post
    I know we have discussed this intriguing subject before, but after everything I have read, I really still think Dr Tumblety was the ripper. Nothing concrete, but he just ticks so many of the boxes.
    Good to see you back Frank. If you haven't read it, I recently read The Lodger - the arrest & escape of Jack The Ripper by Stewart Evans & Paul Gainey. It may well add to your suspicions.

  23. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    16,247
    I should add that my all time favourite book is still In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. A phenomenal piece of work in my view.

  24. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Darkest Lincolnshire.
    Posts
    36,785
    Quote Originally Posted by lemonjelly View Post
    Citizens, By Simon Schama was like that for me. A good read, but 950 pages. Took an eternity to get through!



    Good to see you back Frank. If you haven't read it, I recently read The Lodger - the arrest & escape of Jack The Ripper by Stewart Evans & Paul Gainey. It may well add to your suspicions.
    I have not read that, but will make sure I get to read it.

  25. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    16,247
    Currently reading Pele's autobiography.
    Interesting read. In places, a little thin on detail.

    At the point where he's just retired. Having scored over 1250 goals, for me he hasn't talked much about them (aside from scored 5 here, 3 there etc).
    Comes across as pretty humble mostly.

    A fair amount of referencing God & his belief. Which is suprising when 2 thirds of the way through he talks about a few affairs.

    One thing which struck me whilst reading it, is how we remember Pele. My instant images are (in no particular order)
    His miss from the half way line
    Gordon Banks saving his header
    The dummy where he leaves the ball, goes 1 side of the keeper then doubles back & just misses

    Interesting how these misses appear to be rated as highly significant memories for so many people, above the 1250+ goals...

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pendeford
    Posts
    63,734
    First goal in the 1970 world cup final
    shaking hands and swapping shirts with bobby moore
    The brilliant goal in the 1958 world cup final
    The header and banks save

    The round the keeper and halfway shot were both against uruguay in the 1970 world cup I think.
    I'm looking California

    I'm feeling Minnesota

  27. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    vasilika, evia, greece
    Posts
    10,006
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernWolf View Post
    Does anyone use an e-book reader? Such as the Amazon Kindle?

    I have recently switched to using the Kindle app on my iPad and I am thoroughly enjoying the experience. Not everyone's favourite way to read buy I love having everything in one place (books, newspaper, gaming, internet etc)
    PPB got a kindle for xmas and she loves it, i must look this up and see how it works.
    "Never enter into a battle of wits, with an unarmed man"

  28. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    spiderland
    Posts
    4,013
    Quote Originally Posted by lemonjelly View Post
    Currently reading Pele's autobiography.
    Interesting read. In places, a little thin on detail.

    At the point where he's just retired. Having scored over 1250 goals, for me he hasn't talked much about them (aside from scored 5 here, 3 there etc).
    Comes across as pretty humble mostly.

    A fair amount of referencing God & his belief. Which is suprising when 2 thirds of the way through he talks about a few affairs.

    One thing which struck me whilst reading it, is how we remember Pele. My instant images are (in no particular order)
    His miss from the half way line
    Gordon Banks saving his header
    The dummy where he leaves the ball, goes 1 side of the keeper then doubles back & just misses

    Interesting how these misses appear to be rated as highly significant memories for so many people, above the 1250+ goals...
    For me it's the Carlos Alberto goal in the '70 world cup final. Receiving the outside edge of area, no panic, no rush, and then, after one almost unnoticeable glance to his right laying off at perfect pace for the oncoming full back to score. He made it look very easy.

  29. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pendeford
    Posts
    63,734
    Quote Originally Posted by nimrod View Post
    For me it's the Carlos Alberto goal in the '70 world cup final. Receiving the outside edge of area, no panic, no rush, and then, after one almost unnoticeable glance to his right laying off at perfect pace for the oncoming full back to score. He made it look very easy.
    Have I mentioned that that is my favourite goal of all time?
    I'm looking California

    I'm feeling Minnesota

  30. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    spiderland
    Posts
    4,013
    Quote Originally Posted by Paddingtonwolf View Post
    Have I mentioned that that is my favourite goal of all time?
    If someone described it to you, you'd think they were making it up. I'm sure you must have mentioned it and it's worthy of the accolade.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •