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The Velotard Thread.

Jasperwolf

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E-bikes are a superb option too.
I built my own last year with a kit from Amazon . Works well even. though I kept to the legal 250w. My wife has my old cyclamatic mtb and I also have a dohiker fold up that fits in the car boot . I drive to the outskirts and then pedal in with assistance. On cycle paths I hasten to add !!!
 

CambridgeWolf

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Little village between Arrington and Bourn. Roads not single track but not much bigger especially towards toft and Comberton. Lots of trees and blind corners yet starting at toft right through Comberton and Barton is a cycle path recently widened so you can go all the way to Cambridge without going on the carriage way. Except too many don’t .

Yep, I know it, nice recreational cycling if you head west from there out through Gransden and Abbotsley and over to St Neots too.

That Toft through to Cambridge path though does make you reflect on the comments from others regarding the need for infrastructure. That particular cycle path from the west starts literally miles (7?) outside the city. There is a similar one just built as an arterial route into the City from the north (Burwell >>Quy), another just completed from the east (Linton > Wandelbury > Addenbrookes), and another just completed from the south (A10 > Harston > Addies).

Each of those cost a fortune and ‘some’ motorists are enraged at the cost/per user ratio. I’ve mixed feelings as it is in fact brave putting the infrastructure in first and hoping the gamble pays off long term. I thought extending those paths to entice commuters onto bikes from say 6/10 miles away was ambitious, but maybe the policy makers knew more about the development and impact of e-bikes than most.

Does make you think though about the sheer scale of the investment and commitment needed to make cycling a realistic commuter option nationwide. It’s all very well be anti-car and punitive to motorists if you are providing realistic alternatives, but in these environmentally sensitive times we are in danger of forcing rapid change and being too fast with the former, and too slow with the latter.
 

Jasperwolf

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Yep, I know it, nice recreational cycling if you head west from there out through Gransden and Abbotsley and over to St Neots too.

That Toft through to Cambridge path though does make you reflect on the comments from others regarding the need for infrastructure. That particular cycle path from the west starts literally miles (7?) outside the city. There is a similar one just built as an arterial route into the City from the north (Burwell >>Quy), another just completed from the east (Linton > Wandelbury > Addenbrookes), and another just completed from the south (A10 > Harston > Addies).

Each of those cost a fortune and ‘some’ motorists are enraged at the cost/per user ratio. I’ve mixed feelings as it is in fact brave putting the infrastructure in first and hoping the gamble pays off long term. I thought extending those paths to entice commuters onto bikes from say 6/10 miles away was ambitious, but maybe the policy makers knew more about the development and impact of e-bikes than most.

Does make you think though about the sheer scale of the investment and commitment needed to make cycling a realistic commuter option nationwide. It’s all very well be anti-car and punitive to motorists if you are providing realistic alternatives, but in these environmentally sensitive times we are in danger of forcing rapid change and being too fast with the former, and too slow with the latter.
In fairness cycling in Cambridge is the best option given the restrictions. The last 5 miles on an e bike even pedelec takes me about 25 minutes or so but it’s so much quicker coming home if I am between 4 and 6 finished. I am a fair weather cyclist. I can’t stand being drenched before work . Just off Mill road , Mortimer road by Fenners is where I go to so it’s no trek but it’s dead centre
 

CambridgeWolf

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In fairness cycling in Cambridge is the best option given the restrictions. The last 5 miles on an e bike even pedelec takes me about 25 minutes or so but it’s so much quicker coming home if I am between 4 and 6 finished. I am a fair weather cyclist. I can’t stand being drenched before work . Just off Mill road , Mortimer road by Fenners is where I go to so it’s no trek but it’s dead centre
Well there in a nutshell is how it’s supposed to work - drive to a park and ride hub on the edge of town, bus or cycle/e-scooter/e-cycle to your destination. Now there are such things as folding e-bikes too that’ll go in the boot of a car it’s becoming a workable, cheap, environmentally friendly doddle. These planners must’ve known what they were doing all along.

Sure, you’ll always have the Achilles heel of the misery when it pisses down, but the hubs and cycle lanes strategy seems to make a lot more sense now than it did before, and certainly difficult to argue it’s not a whole lot better than more tarmac and more choking cars.
 

BillyDee

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I live near Stevenage, purpose built cycle paths intrinsic to its design. I very rarely see them used but the roads are chocker.
Articles a couple years old, but still relevant:

 

CambridgeWolf

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Interesting article that. Confirms making cycling more attractive through infrastructure isn’t going to be enough in isolation. Not sure punishing motorists and beating them out of their cars into eventual miserable submission is the right way to go either, but that looks to be the favoured option.
 

machin05

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Thr trouble is that getting people to stop using their cars is literally the only way we can reduce congestion, lower our emissions and make the streets safer. That's before to consider the health benefits of more people taking up active travel for their daily 1-2 mile journeys.

To use language such as "war on motorists" and punishing/beating etc does nothing but make that solution further out of the reach of the common pysche.

Not directed at you specifically @CambridgeWolf btw. Just a general observation of the reaction by many motorists when their road use is threatened
 

CambridgeWolf

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No worries, I agree with much of what you say.

From experience here, you don’t actually have to wage a war on motorists - the council just stopped building more roads. Motorists eventually eat themselves as journeys become unbearable and motorists decide ‘fuck this’ and look for alternatives. If the cycle infrastructure is put in place at the same time there are huge shifts in the right direction.

I was at the dentist this morning and I’m quite sure if I could’ve driven the 2.5 miles and parked outside I would’ve done, but the cheapest, quickest, greenest and healthiest option was the bike. Funny what happens when you stop making it too easy for motorists - see Stevenage above!
 
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